PLIP AND PLOP

A series of five children’s books introducing the notion of watercycle through the adventures of two droplets of water, Plip and Plop. They travel from the turmoil of Scottish skies to English tarns, and from far above the Earth to the Arctic icefloe! Written by educational psychologist Dr. Alan Haughey for primary school children aged 3-7.



THE ENCLOSURE

A children’s book about a dissatisfied girl on a walk in the Cairngorms with her parents. Her encountering with a lush enclosure of trees in the desolate Scottish moorlands will change her relationship with the natural world. The Enclosure was inspired by the remarkable story of two pioneering biologists who experimented with regrowing plots of moorlands in the nineties. They were trying to protect a rare species of fish at Loch Garry in the Cairngorms Mountains and realised that reforesting the shores was an effective solution. The enclosures of trees they planted around the loch now form curious oases in the desertic area around Drumochter Pass.

The experiment they undertook echoed with my interest in understanding our landscape’s history better and my recent read ‘The Natural Explorer’ by Tristan Gooley. Interviewing Derek, one of the biologist, was a chance to get more details on the story. We discussed everything about the reforestation experiment, from types of trees he planted to his frustration with funding institutions. He also talked about his experience as an outdoor teacher and the way he communicates with children to engage with them.



SCOTTISH NATIVE TREES

12 illustrated spreads published in issue 1 and 2 of Edinburgh-based emerging children’s magazine Ehonis. A risography publication experimenting with the concept of picturebook, which first theme explored our Environment.A prompt for a visual exploration of Scottish native tree’s features led to creating a series of masks for each tree. At the crossing between the Green Man myth and the idea of tree spirits, those illustrations are a call for imagination to think what resides behind the bark’s tree.

Mark LOREM IPSUM